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Michael Beran

Associate Professor    ,
Specializations

Comparative cognition; Numerical cognition; Self-control and behavioral inhibition; Prospective memory; Metacognition; Primate cognition; Perception; Decision-making

Biography

My research is focused on learning about and understanding the cognitive abilities, and particularly the cognitive control, exhibited by humans (children and adults) and other species, primarily the great apes and monkey species.  This work is conducted in the Comparative Intelligence and Cognition laboratory and at the Language Research Center of Georgia State University, as well as through collaborations with other institutions such as the National Zoo in Washington, DC and Zoo Atlanta.  I also conduct some research studies with preschool children in the local Atlanta area.

Currently, my students and I are working on six major programs of research: Numerical Cognition; Metacognition; Strategic Economic Interactions; Prospective Memory and Planning; Self-Control and Delay of Gratification; and Perceptual and Cognitive Illusions.  These research projects are supported by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and Georgia State University. Please visit the Comparative Intelligence and Cognition (COMIC) laboratory page, where you can see much more about our research, our publications, and who we are.

Publications

Books

Beran, M. J. (2018). Self-control in animals and people. London: Academic Press.
Beran, M. J., Brandl, J., Perner, J., & Proust, J. (Eds.) (2012). Foundations of Metacognition. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Recent Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles

Agrillo, C., Beran, M. J., & Parrish, A. E. (2019). Exploring the Jastrow illusion in humans (Homo sapiens), rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and capuchin monkeys (Sapajus apella). Perception, 48, 367-385.

Beran, M. J. (2019). Animal metacognition: A decade of progress, problems, and the development of new prospects. Animal Behavior and Cognition, 6, 223-229.

Beran, M. J. (2019). All hail suboptimal choice: Now, can we “fix” it? Comparative Cognition and Behavior Reviews, 14, 19-23.

Beran, M. J., French, K., Smith, T. R., & Parrish, A. E. (2019). Limited evidence of number-space mapping in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and capuchin monkeys (Sapajus apella). Journal of Comparative Psychology, 133, 281-293.

Beran, M. J., Kelly, A. J., Perdue, B. M., Whitham, W., Love, M., Kelly, V., & Parrish, A. E. (2019). Divide and conquer: Preschool children can assign the hardest tasks to a symbolic helper. Experimental Psychology, 66, 296-309.

Parrish, A. E., Beran, M. J., & Agrillo, C. (2019). Linear numerosity illusions in capuchin monkeys (Sapajus apella), rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), and humans (Homo sapiens). Animal Cognition, 22, 883-895.

Beran, M. J. (2018). Replication and pre-registration in comparative psychology. International Journal of Comparative Psychology, 31.

Beran, M. J., & Hopkins, W. D. (2018). Self-control in chimpanzees relates to general intelligence. Current Biology, 28, 574-579.

Boomer, J., Church, B. A., Zakrzewski, A. C., Beran, M. J., Baum, M. L., & Smith, J. D. (2018). I scan, therefore I decline: The time course of difficulty monitoring in humans (Homo sapiens) and macaques (Macaca mulatta). Journal of Comparative Psychology, 132, 152-165.

French, K., Beran, M. J., Espy, K., & Washburn, D. A. (2018). Simians in the Shape School: A comparative study of executive attention. Learning & Behavior, 46, 281-293.

Heimbauer, L. A., Beran, M. J., & Owren, M. J. (2018). A chimpanzee’s (Pan troglodytes) perception of variations in speech: Identification of familiar words when whispered and when spoken by a variety of talkers. International Journal of Comparative Psychology, 31.

Heimbauer, L. A., Conway, C. M., Christiansen, M. H., Beran, M. J., & Owren, M. J. (2018). Visual artificial grammar learning by rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta): Exploring the role of grammar complexity and sequence length. Animal Cognition, 21, 267-284.

Hoffman, M. L., Beran, M. J., & Washburn, D. A. (2018). Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) remember agency information from past events and integrate this knowledge with spatial and temporal features in working memory. Animal Cognition, 21, 137-153.

Kelly, A. J., Perdue, B. M., Love, M. W., Parrish, A. E., & Beran, M. J. (2018). An investigation of prospective memory with output monitoring in preschool children. American Journal of Psychology, 133, 201-210.

Miletto Petrazzini, M. E., Parrish, A. E., Beran, M. J., & Agrillo, C. (2018). Exploring the Solitaire illusion in guppies (Poecilia reticulata). Journal of Comparative Psychology, 132, 48-57.

Parrish, A. E., Afrifa, E. A., & Beran, M. J. (2018). Exploring decoy effects on computerized task preferences in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Animal Behavior & Cognition, 5, 235-253.

Parrish, A. E., James, B. T., Rossettie, M. S., Smith, T. R., Otalora-Garcia, A., & Beran, M. J. (2018). Investigating the depletion effect: Self-control does not waiver in capuchin monkeys. Animal Behavior and Cognition, 5, 118-138.

Parrish, A. E., Perdue, B. M., Kelly, A. J., & Beran, M. J. (2018). Working memory in children assessed with serial chaining and Simon tasks. Behavioural Processes, 157, 528-531.

Perdue, B. M., Beran, M. J., & Washburn, D. A. (2018). The development and evolution of a computerized testing system for primates: Cognition, welfare, and the Rumbaughx. Behavioural Processes, 156, 37-50.

Perdue, B. M., Evans, T. A., & Beran, M. J. (2018). Chimpanzees show some evidence of selectively acquiring information by using tools, making inferences, and evaluating possible outcomes. PLoS ONE, 13, e0193229.

Perdue, B. M., Kelly, A. J., & Beran, M. J. (2018). Assessing distinctiveness effects and “false memories” in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). International Journal of Comparative Psychology, 31.

Smith, T. R., & Beran, M. J. (2018). Task switching in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) and tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) during computerized categorization tasks. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition, 44, 229-246.

Smith, T. R., Smith, J. D., & Beran, M. J. (2018). Not knowing what one knows: A meaningful failure of metacognition in capuchin monkeys. Animal Behavior and Cognition, 5, 55-67.

Whitham, W., Johnson, J., French, K., Beran, M. J., & Washburn, D. A. (2018). Does joystick training facilitate relational learning? International Journal of Comparative Psychology, 31.

Beran, M. J. (2017). To err is (not only) human: Fallibility as a window into primate cognition. Comparative Cognition & Behavior Reviews, 12, 57-81.

Beran, M., & Parrish, A. (2017). The number sense is neither last resort nor of primary import. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 40. doi:10.1017/S0140525X16002065

Beran, M. J., Perdue, B. M., Kelly, A. K., & Parrish, A. E. (2017). What’s in a face (made of foods)? Comparing children’s and monkeys’ perception of faces in face-like images of food. Animal Behavior and Cognition, 4, 324-339.

Parrish, A. E., James, B. J., & Beran, M. J. (2017). Exploring whether nonhuman primates show a bias to overestimate dense quantities. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 131, 59-68.

Parrish, A. E., Otalora-Garcia, A., & Beran, M. J. (2017). Dealing with interference: Chimpanzees respond to conflicting cues in a food-choice memory task. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition, 43, 366-376.

Beran, M. J., James, B. T., Whitham, W., & Parrish, A. E. (2016). Chimpanzees can point to smaller amounts of food to accumulate larger amounts but they still fail the reverse-reward contingency task. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition, 42, 347-358.

Beran, M. J., Menzel, C. R., Parrish, A. E., Perdue, B. M., Sayers, K., Smith, J. D., & Washburn, J. D. (2016). Primate cognition: Attention, episodic memory, prospective memory, self-control, and metacognition as examples of cognitive control in nonhuman primates. WIREs Cognitive Science. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1397

Beran, M. J., & Parrish, A. E. (2016). Capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) treat small and large numbers of items similarly during a relative quantity judgment task. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 23, 1206-1213.

Beran, M. J., Perdue, B. M., Church, B. A., & Smith, J. D. (2016). Capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) modulate their use of an uncertainty response depending on risk. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition, 42, 32-43.

Beran, M. J., Perdue, B. M., Rossettie, M. S., James, B. T., Whitham, W., Walker, B., Futch, S. E., & Parrish, A. E. (2016). Self-control assessments of capuchin monkeys with the rotating tray task and the accumulation task. Behavioural Processes, 129, 68-79.

Beran, M. J., Rossettie, M. S., & Parrish, A. E. (2016). Trading up: Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) show self-control through their exchange behavior. Animal Cognition, 19, 109-121.